Rare Ophthalmology News

Disease Profile

Chromoblastomycosis

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

All ages

ageofonset-all.svg

ICD-10

B43.0 B43.1 B43.2 B43.8 B43.9

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

no.svg

Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

no.svg

X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

no.svg

X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

no.svg

Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

no.svg

Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

no.svg

Not applicable

no.svg

Other names (AKA)

Chromomycosis

Categories

Fungal infections

Summary

Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic fungal infection characterized by raised and crusted lesions which affect the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It most often occurs on the limbs, but can affect any area of the body. Chromoblastomycosis is caused by several fungi found in soil, wood, and decaying plant material. It usually enters the skin through a minor injury such as a splinter.[1] It is most common in areas with tropical and subtropical climates.[2] Treatment of chromoblastomycosis may include medications like itraconazole and flucytosine, cryotherapy, or surgery.[1][2]

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
80%-99% of people have these symptoms
Pruritus
Itching
Itchy skin
Skin itching

[ more ]

0000989
30%-79% of people have these symptoms
Abnormal foot morphology
Abnormal feet structure
Abnormality of the feet
Abnormality of the foot
Foot deformities
Foot deformity

[ more ]

0001760
Annular cutaneous lesion
0025528
Erythematous macule
0025475
Erythematous plaque
0025474
Hyperkeratotic papule
0045059
Hyperparakeratosis
0040009
Predominantly lower limb lymphedema
0003550
Serpiginous cutaneous lesion
0025527
Subcutaneous nodule
Firm lump under the skin
Growth of abnormal tissue under the skin

[ more ]

0001482
Verrucous papule
0012500
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Abnormality of the upper limb
0002817
Atypical scarring of skin
Atypical scarring
0000987
Hypopigmented skin patches
Patchy loss of skin color
0001053
Lymphangiectasis
0031842
Recurrent bacterial infections
Bacterial infections, recurrent
Frequent bacterial infections
Increased susceptibility to bacterial infections
Recurrent major bacterial infections

[ more ]

0002718
Vascular skin abnormality
0011276
1%-4% of people have these symptoms
Abnormal lung morphology
Abnormality of lung structure
Abnormality of the lungs
Abnormally shaped lung
Unusal lung shape

[ more ]

0002088
Abnormal oral cavity morphology
Abnormality of the oral cavity
0000163
Ankylosis
0031013
Ectropion
Eyelid turned out
0000656
Eyelid retraction
0500043
Facial shape deformation
0011334
Immunodeficiency
Decreased immune function
0002721
Keratoconjunctivitis sicca
Dry eyes
0001097
Multiple cutaneous malignancies
0007606
Osteolysis
Breakdown of bone
0002797
Squamous cell carcinoma
0002860

Learn more

These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

Where to Start

  • DermNet NZ is an online resource about skin diseases developed by the New Zealand Dermatological Society Incorporated. DermNet NZ provides information about this condition.

In-Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Merck Manual for health care professionals provides information on Chromoblastomycosis.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Chromoblastomycosis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
  • The The Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections links to a factsheet on Chromoblastomycosis

References

  1. Chromoblastomycosis. DermNet NZ. December 29, 2013; https://www.dermnetnz.org/fungal/chromoblastomycosis.html. Accessed 12/16/2014.
  2. Revankar SG, Sobel JD. Chromoblastomycosis. The Merck Manual Professional Edition. January 2014; https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/infectious_diseases/fungi/chromoblastomycosis.html. Accessed 12/16/2014.